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#FolkloreThursday is trending on Twitter. Popular tweets on #FolkloreThursday.


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Maude Frome
@frome_maude
The fuchsia first arrived at Kew Gardens in 1788, having been discovered in the Caribbean c.1696. It is known as the Virgin Mary’s Earrings, & in Ireland as Deora De, or Tears of God. It is also a favourite hiding place of fairies. #FolkloreThursday Image: Cicely Mary Barker https://t.co/CUMg9tvuBM
21 Jan, 06:43 AM UTC
hazel Ⓥ 💙
@ahazelhare
The bells of foxgloves ring to warn foxes of hunters and the fairies give foxglove blooms to foxes to put on their paws to prevent them from being heard when they raid chicken coops. Art by Kelly Louise Judd #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/6ZO3GZfaMb
21 Jan, 09:01 AM UTC
Coffin Boffin
@DrSamGeorge1
BLUEBELL A dangerous & potent fairy flower; the Scottish name for the plant is 'Deadmen's Bells'. To hear the ring of a Bluebell is to hear one's death knell. A Bluebell wood is full of fairy woven spells & enchantments #FolkloreThursday #GothicSpring 🎨Rheam; Froud https://t.co/g7Zv27rf9U
21 Jan, 11:10 AM UTC
VenetiaJane's Garden
@VenetiaJane
Chinese legend: The soul of a peony was transformed into human form by the love of her master. Fearing a priest’s disapproval when he visited their home she disappeared. Her portrait remained on the wall, but her image slowly faded, revealing a beautiful flower. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/ipUX6aqRsC
21 Jan, 09:58 AM UTC
Karen Lee Street 📚
@karenleestreet
In floriography, Persian ranunculus (ranunculus asiaticus) means “you are radiant with charms.” Origin legend: a besotted prince sang to a nymph every night to woo her, but she silenced his endless crooning by turning him into a lovely ranunculus #GothicSpring #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/NFsLmtqvYR
21 Jan, 09:06 AM UTC
P J Richards
@P_J_Richards
🌿✨🌿Bay beliefs... The tree is never struck by lightning. Grown beside a house it guards those within from infection, particularly plague. Carry leaves for protection against evil spirits and contagion. Place leaves under your pillow to bring pleasant dreams. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/wX6b24cKq8
21 Jan, 09:53 AM UTC
Mark Rees
 @reviewwales
"The fairies of #Wales favour the oak-tree and the female oak especially because of its wide-spreading branches & deeper shade. It is dangerous to cut down a female oak & some lost their lives by a strange aching pain which admitted no remedy" #FolkloreThursday #ThursdayThoughts @reviewwales's photo on #FolkloreThursday
21 Jan, 09:06 AM UTC
History and Folklore Podcast
@HistoryFolklore
It is believed the souls of the dead, particularly murdered men, dwell within thyme flowers and thyme is said to grow in places where people have died. It is, however, taboo to use thyme as a funeral flower as `the dead have nothing to do with thyme.` #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/8Q2226H4tg
21 Jan, 09:11 AM UTC
Folklore, Food & Fairytales
@FairytalesFood
Yarrow is named for Achilles used it to heal his soldiers on the battlefield. It’s been used for centuries to slow & stop blood flow. A sprig of Rue & some Yarrow off a grave sprinkled with a few drops of Amber oil can promote dreams of your future destiny. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/5MWJL2pGeQ
21 Jan, 09:10 AM UTC
Woodland Trust🌳
 @WoodlandTrust
#Snowdrops are associated with hope and purity. According to folklore, the green coloured stem symbolises health and well-being, whilst the white flower symbolises the light of the pale winter sun, now strengthening by the day☀️ https://t.co/JxGpgH3gLW #FolkloreThursday @WoodlandTrust's photo on #FolkloreThursday
21 Jan, 12:01 PM UTC
SelineSigil
@SelineSigil9
British Library digitized the oldest such volume,a 1000 year-old illuminated manuscript known as the Cotton MS Vitellius C III. The book, “is the only surviving illustrated Old English herbal, or book describing plants and their uses.” #folklorethursday https://t.co/n3dGdoCcb0
21 Jan, 09:49 AM UTC
🕷️Liza Frank 🇪🇺
@lilithepunk
It's said that those who can grow parsley are either a witch or a rogue.... #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/Ojxzj58r3X
21 Jan, 11:31 AM UTC
Anna @DoubleProficiency 🌱
@2xproficiency
Juniper is a tree that never grows up. It can live for over 1000 years and still only bear juvenile leaves. As such, it protects the children - its aromatic smoke can guide the kid's spirit to maturity during a ritual of passage. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/9n8C8LraQK
21 Jan, 09:17 AM UTC
Michele Cook
@michelemcook1
In the Victorian Language of Flowers, the camellia symbolised gratitude or perfection. To receive a pink camellia meant that somebody was longing for you. #FolkloreThursday #Flowers #Camellias #Pink #Nature #Gardening #ThursdayThoughts https://t.co/ZcU1nviFpi
21 Jan, 09:05 AM UTC
UzunbacakAdem
@TheUzunbacak
We Turks like give our daughters flower names! 🌷🌺🌸🌼🌻🥀 You see below a few examples! There are many more of them, actually countless 😊 #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/KKzyeB0d85
21 Jan, 09:57 AM UTC
Icy Sedgwick
@IcySedgwick
Chionodoxa forbesii are called 'Glory of the Snow' because they sometimes bloom so early in the year their beautiful blue flowers poke through the snow! #FolkloreThursday [image by me] https://t.co/lIlOLFQP2p
21 Jan, 09:40 AM UTC
TL Rose
@WhyDoWeBelieve
Ghost Pipe is a rare flower with hardly any pigment. If you happen upon one, consider yourself lucky. Of prepared correctly, the plant is thought to relieve eye trouble and general pain. #folklorethursday Photo credit: Peggy Easterly https://t.co/qknTdzWaoM
21 Jan, 11:45 AM UTC
curious ordinary
@curiousordinary
Peony flowers are much loved in China & feature prominently in art & folklore. They symbolise royalty, wealth & honour & are often used in poetry to symbolise young girls. In art they can represent a wish for riches to come to the recipient. #FolkloreThursday #flowers #plantlore https://t.co/5NHopeJcmJ
21 Jan, 09:23 AM UTC
Jane Hoodless
@JaneHoodless
Famous for its hypnotic effect on cats, catmint was also drunk to induce slumber, tho the root–if chewed–was said to make the meekest person fierce & quarrelsome. T'were stories of a hangman who lacked the courage to perform his duty until he chewed such a root. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/i0eCVGGjmF
21 Jan, 09:47 AM UTC
Woodland Trust🌳
 @WoodlandTrust
#Ivy (Hedera helix) was associated with Bacchus, the Roman god of agriculture, wine and fertility. Bushes or ivy-covered poles advertised taverns in medieval England, and wearing a wreath of ivy leaves was supposed to prevent intoxication https://t.co/w7dbPbryQz #FolkloreThursday @WoodlandTrust's photo on #FolkloreThursday
21 Jan, 10:01 AM UTC
Guy Reisman
@ReismanGuy
In Serbian (though related stories exist throughout the Balkans) folklore, the red discoloration on some melons was assumed to stem from the melon having turned into a vampire after being left around to bathe in the light of the full moon.#FolkloreThursday https://t.co/obde15ND0x
21 Jan, 09:36 AM UTC
Catherine Cawley 💙
@catecawley
A #flower of hope and associated with #winter and #January, Snowdrops are a symbol of #spring and purity. Also known as little snow bells, dew-drops, drooping lily, #Candlemas bells, #snow-flower, white ladies and white-bells #FolkloreThursday #nature https://t.co/91QUgPrM4m
21 Jan, 09:27 AM UTC
Egenur
@turkishwitch
Jubokko is a yōkai tree that appears in battlefields where people have died. It does not differ much from a normal tree but it lives on blood. When a human passes by, it captures the human and sucks the blood out of its victim. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/9obn2niYRK
21 Jan, 11:32 AM UTC
Olivia Armstrong
@oliviasstories
In European folklore lilies were planted to prevent ghosts from entering the garden... 🎨Singer Sargent #FolkloreThursday @FolkloreThurs https://t.co/u0DhPfqaxw
21 Jan, 01:03 PM UTC
curious ordinary
@curiousordinary
Re-tweeting this flowering #yokai tree for #FolkloreThursday. https://t.co/jdoFB0hjsS
21 Jan, 09:24 AM UTC
Wunderkammer
@DirkPuehl
"... so toadstools and every plant that has any touch of mystery, such as foxgloves, mulleins and certain kinds of orchis... all lean towards Elfland" (Dunsany) ... and foxgloves did never protect foxes' paws, but those of the Little People: "folks' gloves" #folklorethursday https://t.co/jBbfEAWKeb
21 Jan, 01:05 PM UTC
Liminal 11
@Liminal_11
Good morning #FolkloreThursday! This is @Rosdottir taking over the Liminal feed for a day of plant and flower folklore 🌿 All the snippets I'll be sharing today are sneak previews from Botanical Curses and Poisons, which you can get your hands on here: https://t.co/1EvEsRKDh3
21 Jan, 11:51 AM UTC
Tatiana Fajardo
@Tatiana19796
#FolkloreThursday In Medieval times,mandrake was considered a key ingredient in a multitude of witches' flying ointment recipes.Some believed that witches applied these ointments or ingested these potions to fly to gatherings with the Devil, or to experience bacchanalian carousal https://t.co/djSjPSDYas
21 Jan, 09:05 AM UTC
Dr. Zalka Csenge Virág
@TarkabarkaHolgy
Hungarian folktale: a gardener and her daughter buy a clump of violets from a beggar. After years of tending to them the flowers begin to cry, and the girl discovers a prince has been turned into violets by his evil stepmother. In the end her kindness saves him. #FolkloreThursday https://t.co/hOxV8aAm9Z
21 Jan, 12:51 PM UTC
Folklore Thursday 💙
@FolkloreThurs
Good morning #FolkloreThursday thank you @WillowWinsham for a flourishing start @HerbalStorytell now joining you as host until 12 after waking from a dream of celebrating Spring by tying a ribbon to a clooty tree~pic of the tree that marks where Robert Kirk was stolen by the fae https://t.co/q6j4m3r7Pp
21 Jan, 11:11 AM UTC

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